Series chart

Series chart

You can use the series chart to analyze the data that is present as a time series in your activity. You can put up to 5 series on top of each other and synchronize up to 100 additional diagrams. 

Primary value

By clicking on the serial type button in the legend, you select the primary value. This has its y-axis on the left side and the series is highlighted. 

Segments

In addition to the series data, you can also view the aggregated segments in the diagram. 

Zones

If a speed, power, heart rate or cadence series has been selected, the zone boundaries can be displayed by clicking on the "Show Zones" button. 

Zoom

You can select a range for a time period in the chart, which shows you the average values and allows you to zoom in. 

Training diagram of a length's swim with pace zone limits and heart rate
Training diagram of a length's swim with pace zone limits and heart rate

Chart settings

Chart height

The charts can be displayed at normal height or at a decreased height, to make a little more space when you display many activity diagrams or when they are not needed.

Synchronisation

Several diagrams can be either synchronized or decoupled from each other. 'Synchronized' means that the x-axis indicator synchronously follows the mouse position on all charts. 

Axis indicator

A Y- and X-axis indicator can be displayed simultaneously or only the X-axis indicator alone. 

Breaks

You can display or hide breaks on the activity chart.  

Walking phases

For running or miscellaneous activities you can display or hide the walking phases. 

Elevation profile of a 200-mile bike race with temperature curve
Elevation profile of a 200-mile bike race with temperature curve

Series settings

Lower/upper limit

With the lower and upper limit, you can put a filter on the data series that cuts off the lower and upper value range. This can make sense for very confused series, or to remove measurement errors or outliers.

Simplify

Simplification reduces the number of data points in a time series while at the same time maintaining the informative value, as long as simplification has not been over-applied. Unlike smoothing, simplifying does not add data points. Smoothing would be aesthetically pleasing, but it no longer reflects the true course. We have therefore opted for the more honest option in this case. 

Training diagrams of an interval run showing step frequency zone limits in the lower diagram
Training diagrams of an interval run showing step frequency zone limits in the lower diagram